ACT – Adventures in Cross-Training: Free up!

Those who know, know that We RUN Tings is about more than running. It’s also about our Adventures in Cross-Training, the different things that we do for healthy fun when we’re not running. And our most popular ACT event is on the horizon: We Wuk Up and Wine Tings Weekend at Toronto Carnival.

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This year promises to be another spectacular year. Carnival culture brings with it so many benefits. It’s about loving our bodies just as they are, dressing those bodies up in celebration, and dancing in the streets with friends and strangers alike. It’s exercise seemingly without effort — last year one of our members reportedly clocked over 20KM while “chipping down de road,” singing, laughing, and socializing for hours. It’s about “freeing up” — letting go of stress and just having a great time, which is very healthy. It’s self-love and stress-relief in the sunshine to a soca soundtrack.

As the weeks go by leading up to the Carnival, we hope you’ll check our website for valuable information for how you can get involved, whether it’s playing mas with our crew, watching and waving on the sidelines, or getting healthy wherever you are so that you can have the stamina for your own adventures.

If you are interested in signing up to be in the Carnival parade on July 30, or you just want to ask some questions about it, please email weruntingsworld@gmail.com or call 647.772.6244.

Reasons to Run: Fun with friends at the Mercedes-Benz Oakville 10K

We RUN Tings invites you to join us the Mercedes-Benz Oakville 10k on Sunday, April 27, 2014. Presented by New Balance Oakville, all funds raised through this popular race will be donated to the Oakville Hospital Foundation. Participants will enjoy pituresque views of Oakville’s lakeshore and a variety of fun events for all ages, including a 5k High School Challenge, a 1k Junior Jog, and a 300m Toddler Trot! But wait, there’s more! One lucky winner will drive away in a brand new 2014 Mercedes-Benz CLA.

971410_10151789214270465_831301863_nFor Barbara H., it’s worth a four-hour drive from across the border — even longer, if she stops at every Timmy’s! Here, Barbara shares her reasons for running, and tips for newbies.

Why did you start running?

I was always a runner off and on from the age of 13. I was inspired by older brothers who all were cross country runners. As an adult, I always dreamed of running again, but I didn’t fully pursue it again until last year. I was inspired by a group of my friends who had started running and that ignited that spark in me once again.

I started out on the track at first, running one lap and walking one, then running two and walking one. I did this until I could run a mile non-stop. Then I moved my track training to the treadmill. This is where I worked on building my distance. Before I knew it, I had built up enough endurance to run longer distances.

1174590_10151789216845465_409063980_nWhat different places have you gone to run (cities, countries)?

I run most often in Detroit [Michigan, USA], my hometown. However, last summer, I ran in Toronto [Ontario, CANADA] with We RUN Tings. That was my first international running experience.

Why did you decide to do the Mercedes Benz 10K in Oakville?

I had so much fun with We RUN Tings in Toronto last year. Having a group of runners that support you to become better and provides opportunities to see the world through running is great. I look forward to the positive energy that We RUN Tings gives me as a runner. They are really an amazing, supportive group.

Have you run a 10K before?

In November of 2013, I ran my first 10k at the Thanksgiving Day Turkey Trot in Detroit.

What advice do you have for other runners who may be just getting started?

I’d tell new runners these few points:

  • Don’t pressure yourself
  • Just take it one day at a time
  • Do your best, not anyone else’s best
  • Listen to your body
  • Oh yeah, and join a great running group!

Crossing the line

Today, I officially crossed the line.

You just never know when that is going to happen. It’s like a surprise party. Once the shock has worn off, you can clearly see all the signs that should have alerted you that something was going to happen. You just didn’t recognize them until everybody jumped up in your face, screaming: SURPRISE! (Got’cha real good, huh?)

I should have known when I opened my eyes this morning. I had been stressed out yesterday and went to bed with a whole lot on my mind, unable to get a really good sleep. Waking up, all I could think about was how much I wanted, no NEEDED to get out there and clear my head. See that right there? The first clue. I went to bed feeling BAD and I saw going for a morning run as something that would make me feel BETTER. Not aspirin. Not a warm soak in the tub. Not a hot cup of tea or (vegan) ice cream. I wanted to RUN. I needed to run.

I only hoped it wouldn’t be too cold. It was 6:15AM, still dark, and the whole world seemed to be asleep.

Checking the weather (the Weather Network app said 2 degrees, plus a girlfriend texted me to say that it was mild outside), I made lunch for my kids and then went to get dressed. I layered up (including the ultra-big headphones to protect my sensitive-and-always-cold ears) and donned the running shoes. With a deep breath, I stepped outside into the cold (but mild) sparkling morning air. It was 7:05AM.

The sun had just started to rise. As I stood in the slushy snow, without my even realizing it, it happened. I crossed over: from mere mortal to serious runner.

This morning was the first time I ever had to shovel a path through the snow before a run. Mortal Me would have turned right around and taken her sleep-deprived body back to bed. Super Me was having none of that. She wanted to get out there BAD. So, path cleared, I picked my way through the wet snow to the street.

The snowplows hadn’t made it yet. The slush was ankle deep. Undaunted, I gingerly crossed to the middle of the road and kept right on stepping. I hailed up one of my neighbours (who looked a bit shocked to see me out there) and made my way to the main street. There, as luck would have it, I found a section of sidewalk a few blocks long that was clear. I claimed that stretch of concrete for my own, and hit the ground running. Literally.

As my feet pounded the ground, and the wind pounded my face, I began to lose myself in the beat (Talib Kweli’s “Get By” didn’t hurt either, I was feeling NO pain) and let my mind flow wherever it wanted. I thought about my long gone friend, Hubert, and how amazed he would be at my progress. I thought about why running is good for our bodies and good for the community. I thought about new (old school) songs I could add to my playlist (I have a 5K tomorrow — I’m going to need Cameo’s “Shake your pants”). I thought about how great it is to get my workout out of the way first thing in the morning, and go off to work having already accomplished something.

Mortal Me was distracted (and embarrassed) by the looks on the faces of the people waiting at the bus stop. I couldn’t even bring myself to run past them, I turned back a few feet away and ran in the other direction. Twice. I recognized that look. A lot of people, especially us African-Caribbean people, make that face when we see people jogging outside in the cold. The look says: “She crazy? Bwoy, mi tell yuh, some people a bin in dis country TOO long!”

Super Me had to admit it: I was crazy! But I was also supremely confident, drunk with my success, amazed at my tenacity, all wonderful, positive, life-affirming feelings. I realized that I am an addict. I had to have that feeling. And no snow or slush or funny looks from strangers was going to stop me.

As I slowed to my cool-down walk, I felt like I was glowing. I know I was smiling. I was brimming with energy as I turned my steps toward home.

The best part was walking into my home, now alive with the sounds of my family. My husband and children were amazed that I had been out there, not just running in the snow but ENJOYING running in the snow. My daughter, 7 years old, hugged my legs and exclaimed: “Mommy! I want to go with you next time!”

Life is good on the other side of the line.